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Title: Teaching African Popular Music Studies at University
Type: Manuscript
Authors/Creators:
Collins J
Description:
This paper will examine the various ways African and particularly Ghanaian popular music studies are important for the colleges and universities of Ghana I have sometimes been asked why is it necessary to study African popular music at university level. Some consider it too ephemeral and short-lived, too frivolous and trivial, too low-brow and of low status. However, the first generation of great African leaders, such as Nyere of Tanzania, Sekou Toure of Guinea, President Keita of Mali and Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana - all fully recognised the important role that popular music and mass entertainment played in the independence struggle. For instance, in Ghana during the late 1940's concert parties such as the Axim Trio staged plays in support of Nkrumah and his 'independence now' sentiments, whilst highlife composers such as E.K. Nyame, Squire Addo, Kwaa Mensah and E.T. Mensah wrote numerous pro Nkrumah songs or supported his Convention Peoples Party. So not only did Nkrumah and the other first generation of African leaders foster traditional African performance, but they also established state popular bands and the trade unions, national competitions and recording studios to sustain them. Let us now turn to the current situation in the university where popular African music courses were introduced in the mid 1990's. Besides preparing Music Department students for jobs in the expanding Ghanaian music industry, popular music studies are pertinent to other departments of the university. It is relevant to the political sciences: as not only did mass entertainment play a significant role in the independence struggle, it also helps forge national and Pan African identities and sometimes, as 'protest' music, provides a socio-political critique of the status quo. The text of popular songs (and plays) are a valuable source of information for students and staff in the social-science and history departments as they provide the views, ideals and 'history of the inarticulate' masses, whose opinions might not otherwise be documented . Popular music studies, being largely a trans-ethnic urban phenomenon, also help sociologists examine African emergent urban identities: such as those of connected with migration patterns, class, gender and generational youth sub-cultures. Another value of university based popular music studies is that it helps in understanding the trans-Atlantic cross-linkages between Africa and the Black Diaspora in the Americas. Furthermore, because in Africa, traditional and popular performance styles co-exist side by side, they mutually influence each in a dynamic feed-back relationship between old and new, indigenous and foreign - which throws doubt on simplistic developmental theories of social-aesthetic change that see tradition and modernity as antagonistic. Finally, just as the United States has it own national 'jazz' music played by literally thousands of college groups, university highlife bands are needed in Ghana to show-case world class highlife performances for local people and foreigners alike.
Copyright: John Collins
File: Download here (110 kBytes)
Year:
2005
Title: The BAPMAF Highlife Institute and Highlife Photo Exibition
Type: Project Description
Authors/Creators:
John Collins
Description:
BAPMAF is a Ghanaian NGO established in 1990 by Professor John Collins, encouraged and assisted by a group of leading Ghanaian popular musicians (King Bruce, E.T. Mensah, Beattie Casely-Hayford, Koo Nimo, Kwaa Mensah and Edinam Ansah) who were concerned with the lack of research and information on local Ghanaian highlife music and the demise of the 'classical' styles of this genre. Since then the archives has expanded into other areas of African music, both popular and traditional.
Copyright: Scientific African
Year:
2005
Title: Asaakummine tengdar
Type: Audio
Authors/Creators:
Local Dimension
Description:
Ancestors time / In the olden days (3:38)
Copyright: John Collins
File: http://files.saoas.org/Asaakummine tengdar by Local Dimension.mp3
Year:
2003
Title: Sogtaa
Type: Audio
Authors/Creators:
Local Dimension
Description:
Help each other (2:48)
Copyright: John Collins
File: http://files.saoas.org/Sogtar by Local Dimension.mp3
Year:
2003
Title: Bobo Dioulasso
Type: Audio
Authors/Creators:
Local Dimension
Description:
(3:01)
Copyright: John Collins
File: http://files.saoas.org/Bobo Dioulasso by Local Dimension.mp3
Year:
2003
Title: Hitechnology, Individual Copyright and Ghanaian Music.
Type: Article
Authors/Creators:
Collins J
Publisher:
The Council For Research in Values and Philosophy, Washington D.C.
Source:
In: H. Lauer (ed.) "Ghana: Changing Values Changing Technologies", published by The Council For Research in Values and Philosophy, Washington D.C.
Copyright: John Collins
File: Download here (46 kBytes)
Year:
2000
Title: Making Ghanaian Music Exportable
Type: Manuscript
Authors/Creators:
Collins J
Source:
paper read at the Ghana Music Awards Workshop held at the National Theatre, Accra, 6th April 2001
Copyright: John Collins
File: Download here (58 kBytes)
Year:
2001
Title: Cover Story: Ghana's music industry today
Type: Article
Authors/Creators:
John Collins
Source:
West Africa, 4339, pp8-13, August 2002
Copyright: John Collins
File: Download here (579 kBytes)
Year:
2002
Title: BABMAF Continuous Report
Type: Project Description
Authors/Creators:
John Collins
Description:
Continuous report from September 1990
Copyright: John Collins
File: Download here (56 kBytes)
Year:
1990
Title: BAPMAF Archival Materials
Type: Project Description
Authors/Creators:
John Collins
Description:
Brief list of all archival materials until September 2003
Copyright: John Collins
File: Download here (94 kBytes)
Year:
2003
Title: Danceability
Type: Article
Authors/Creators:
Fellows C
Source:
BBC Focus on Africa April-June 2002, p55
Copyright: John Collins
File: Download here (117 kBytes)
Year:
2002

Created 2005 by user jcollins
Time of request 01/11/2014 06:07 (GMT+1)


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